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AQC Release for Tuesday, July 6th, 2010


AQC SPIT
$11 + Shipping
(214 pp. ~ 7x10)
ISBN 9781451529203

SPIT



:: Click Here to Preview the SPIT Issue ::

Words: Bobby Parker, Finnegan Flawnt, Amy Wright, Chipmunx, Margaret Elysia Garcia, Mick Parsons, Guillermo Yáñez Tapia, Gregory James Wyrick, JM.Persánch, Matt Sven Calvert, evan lee ward, James Beach, and Una entrevista con Rubén Bareiro Saguier por Jason Weiss.

Visuals: Berkay Bugdanoglu, David Levy, Deborah Valentine, Sam Garton, Si Clark, Brent Becker, David DeFigueredo, Bianca Olson, Kafak Vodka, Otto Rapp, Marcela Bolívar, Sophie Berdzenishvili, Christian Demare, Remy Tassou, Scott Wilson

Films: Anne Sexton, Harlan Ellison Interview (part 1), BOMB IT trailer, and Philip K. Dick documentary (part 1), and Jerome Murat.

[ previews and content links below ]

 

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010

Works by Berkay Bugdanoglu, David Levy, Deborah Valentine, Sam Garton, and Si Clark.

NOODLES

Bobby Parker

There it was, after the TV guide in the newspaper: DIRTY CHAT WITH LIVE GIRLS, only 35p per minute. I dialled the number.

   To go straight to the first available girl, press one, said an automated voice…

- Hello, this is Michelle.
Her accent was strong, Newcastle.
- Hi, my name is Rob...erm... never done this kind of thing before, not quite sure what to say...
- Well, let me tell you a little bit about myself. I’m about five feet five inches tall with long blonde hair and thirty four double D boobs. My legs are muscular and my body is toned with a healthy tan. My eyes are green and I’m horny today.
- Really? Well, erm...  
- Why don’t you tell me what you look like. Are you wanking right now?
My penis lay half erect across my left leg like a sausage no one wants. I lifted it up and let it slap back onto my leg.
- No, well, a bit, just never called these things before and wondered what it would be like. Does it depress you, talking to wanking men all the time? Suppose the money must be good, and...
- Well... the... why don’t you tell me what you want me to do to myself?
- How about you beg me to fuck you?

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Narcolepsy

Finnegan Flawnt

I suffered from narcolepsy well into my thirties.

It made it difficult for me to hold down even menial jobs. Once I did a stint in a burger shop, a corner business, greasy hair and rats in the kitchen, half of the customers drunk at seven in the morning. When the shop opened, I was always the first to arrive and the last to leave. The Greek owner had a strict regimen, perhaps he thought he was Alexander the Great or something. He also had two women, both of whom thought they alone were married to him. He saw one during the day the other one in the evenings and often slept in the shop alone. Anyways, around this guy I seemed to have kicked my spell. But one day, as I was stirring a bunch of fat-dripping fries in a pan, I simply slumped. The fries landed on the floor, and I was fired. From a burger place! So I figured I needed to find a job where I could take naps any time without attracting too much attention. I thought: security guard.

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Raw

Amy Wright

Do I want to witness the convergence of forces
that have acted (and continue to act) on me?
               -Ander Monson

What kind of girl do you take me for?
I want you on my team
So does everybody else
               
-Nelly Furtado

 

A white boy cruising the grocery store parking lot, ghetto blasters throbbing his shiny red, gifted Camaro, will seem ironic but it’s not. Music is a pistol, a featherbed, a whip. There’s power in it, especially rap. So much willful freedom.  “That feeling that you get inside your stomach is our proof,” Brother Ali chants like a hungry mongrel pulling out of hell with a caramel strand. Street preaching. Adamancy of belief. It seems like anger but is defense, the best of which, the footballers say, is a good offense. You can punch your way through anything. You can knock down the guard and sidle in. 

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The American Dream

Chipmunx

October 17th, 2012

           
Having received his invitation to the American Dream, Max Patrique truly deserved a piece of the pie. He lost his job during the Great Recession's double dip when the Dow plunged again below 7000. His unemployment checks had already stopped coming for several months. All credit cards were maxed, the house was in foreclosure, and the car was repossessed. It was a gift from God, a miracle, that he would be invited on an all expense paid trip to be offered a permanent position employed with one of America's Fortune 500 companies. And with it, he would receive full coverage health and life insurance for himself as well as for his thirteen year old daughter and seven year old son; spouses too were covered, but Max's wife had died of brain cancer in 2009. The Patrique's had no health or life insurance at the time. Unpredictable medical expenses drained all of their lifelong savings.

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Come and Play

Margaret Elysia Garcia

 

That spring, I felt the whole earth try to throw itself. I woke up, holding tightly to my patchwork stuffed horse, Patches, as I fell off the top bunk. My Siamese cat, Brownie, circled and howled, then scurried to the far corner under the bed and couldn't be coaxed out.

“It’s just an earthquake,” Mama said, trying to calm me.

I remained huddled in my Holly Hobbie sleeping bag on the floor.

"Sometimes nature needs to move quickly and loudly. It’s okay. We're all still here.. It’s over.” She pet my hair for hours, there on the floor. I stared at the stars and the moons on my wall. They hadn’t moved. I stared under the bed at Brownie whose eyes remained wide. His ears were flat against the top of his head. I wanted to pet Brownie and let him know that Mama said once a big movement like that happens, another bad scary thing like that won't come for a long, long time—but he hissed at me and tried to bite at me.

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Jury of Her Peers

Mick Parsons


 
After the paper came out, Denise sat in her cell and decided on her course of action. Everyone knew, anyway. Everyone always knew everything before the paper came out on Wednesday; but they never knew enough, and what people didn’t know, they made up. All anybody would see was that she had been arrested. No one would be surprised. And no one would bother to listen, either.
 
Denise liked Sheriff Cleary because he was an old man who still looked at women as the weaker sex and in need of protection. Even when he was forced to arrest one he made sure they were as comfortable as possible. He let her have the starched white bed sheets to put on her bunk, let her keep the toilet seat, and even put a little chair in the cell to give her someplace else to sit. The only other thing in the cell besides the rusty sink was an old Gideon’s Bible. Pages were missing and what pages were left was covered with obscene drawings.

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Works by Brent Becker, David DeFigueredo, Bianca Olson, Kafka Vodka, and Otto Rapp.

Teoría de la imagen: Apuntes para una ontología del sentido en la imagen técnica digital

Guillermo Yáñez Tapia


“La clave para entender el estatus de la realidad virtual hay que buscarla
en la diferencia entre la imitación y la simulación: la realidad virtual no imita la realidad, la simula a base de generar una semblanza de realidad.
En otras palabras, la imitación imita un modelo real preexistente, mientras
que la simulación genera la semblanza de una realidad inexistente:
simula algo que no existe.”

                                                                ~Slavoj Žižek

 

La cuestión de la imagen técnica digital:

Por otro lado la imagen técnica posee cualidades que la hacen escapar de dicha definición genérica. Esto radica en la manera en cómo se configura el referente al interior del sentido postmoderno de la imagen y de la técnica. No es la técnica lo que provoca esto sino el sentido dado a la técnica. Veamos.  El soporte digital logra llevar a término el proyecto modernista: transforma la visualidad (percepción) en información  que puede ser sometida a cálculos (programa) que derivan del texto científico (abstracción como sentido de mundo).  Esta digitalización de la imagen  reconstituye el mundo  en una especie de mundo paralelo, de otro mundo que no necesita del original para poder constituirse como tal -a eso apunta su sentido. Algunos ven en el desarrollo de la imagen simulada digitalmente el inicio de lo que se ha dado en denominar popularmente postmodernismo. Se piensa que en su característica de producto posindustrial se esconde un suceso que termina con las intenciones del proyecto modernista: hacer del mundo un modelo inteligible. Es  precisamente en este proyecto donde se encuentra  el logro de desarticular el mundo en un nuevo orden codificado de manera abstracta y manipulable.

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Works by Marcela Bolívar, Sophie Berdzenishvili, and Christian Demare.

From "The List of Loss: Feb to March"
Gregory James Wyrick


One to invisible foes
And one to an early tomb
One to her poisonous rose
And one to her sullen groom
And my one true love, to her silent repose
Behind May's new moon

We all wait to break
But some leave far too soon

[ end ]

Mi Sombra
JM.Persánch


Mi sombra, fiel compañera,
allá donde me dirijo, tú no tienes sitio.
Has sido la mitad de mi vida, también testigo
de mis penas y glorias, de mis enredos divertidos,
de mis miserias y de mis éxitos furtivos, puro sin sentido,
y también del amanecer de mis días, día tras día.
Tic tac, tic tac, tic tac.
Hemos envejecido juntos, conocido
y acariciado las palabras más bellas,
hemos sido un cuerpo en dos partes,
yo, pecador, tú, espiritual,
contigo viví experiencias fascinantes,
te quise tanto que compartí hasta mis amantes,
Tic tac, tic tac, tic tac.

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La libertad del silencio
JM.Persánch


Yo,
Camino, camino, camino…
y por más que doy pasos al frente,
tu sombra me sigue junto a mi destino,
y por más que quiero perderte,
siempre estás ahí presente;

Y yo,
Me alejo, me alejo, me alejo…
o eso creía, yo, un libre ignorante.

Estoy enfermo.
Estamos enfermos.
Tú, también:
porque ambos cargamos
con la miseria de nuestros amos,
porque ambos llevamos
el peso del hambre en las manos,
y porque a la espalda llevamos
el corazón a cuestas y nunca descansamos

(y nos han hecho creer que es normal)

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Borehead
Matt Sven Calvert


green/pink veils were lifted and swung away as I peered and was led astray
you always have such wonderful ideas!

You say we'll build a fort with that pillow, and some couch cushions
                                               a couple of blankets and we'll need that toy keyboard


and outside the message is spread to all the villagers a hundred miles away from Kenya
visitors have come in a large white moving tank they say it's money and food

everyone runs from the bush / they're going to show a moving picture but the chief turns them away
who knows of such things? Long hair and too many coverings
they brought a message of the american god but now they go away
and tomorrow i'll go to work breaking rocks to build a road and the government gives us rice for pay

read more...

Rotten Avocados Covered With Toothpaste
Matt Sven Calvert


i don't live.
i don't die.

i don't march through blood soaked
fields
i don't run while the mortars
rip
the ground apart

    all around me.

i snort.
i drink.
i smoke.
i laugh.
i vomit.

i bleed from the mouth
like an
infant

read more...

weezy lead head
evan lee ward


Has been digging
Failed in business
Low deep weezing
All day sleeping
Tongue done tasted
copper teeth jaded
Life falsified
declared unsatisfied
Clinches teeth
Closes eyes
Squeezes out
a messy goodbye

read more...

The head is closer to the sun than the foot
evan lee ward


Survive to die
Die to survive
Beings of all collaspse and grow anew.
Seasonal changes bear the burden of witness
within the curfew, junctioned to be.
Now knows not knew.
The mountains stand,
the rivers flow,
bellies are empty,
bowls are full.
This is our inheritance;
to stand as the bull with his horns of power,
confined in the pen of his master.
Reflections present the infinite loop,
uncovering the fruit we so desire to place back upon the tree.
Deliver us from knowledge oh tormentous memory!
We have suffered so much to strive for so little!

[ end ]

Works by Remy Tassou and Scott Wilson.

Benders

James Beach


BELIEVING in words as a profession is a tricky biz; the eminence of words being not what society currently believes in, but their origins being what’s significant and needs to be looked at as the vox populi continues to achieve clout alongside the lower and less-educated classes rising in the media and drowning out the academics/learned/studied. Specifically, paying attention to—giving or bestowing concentration upon—the haphazard-seeming adages and slogans and colloquialisms being bandied about by the general population, without a thought or consideration given to the origins and precise meanings of what is being said, is of utmost importance as SpellCheck and its accompanying grammar guides help an  aspiring writer to, ostensibly, get a leg up on—to achieve a stage of a journey/course beyond that of a writer using pad and paper rather than the electronic version being “helped”—the competition. Linguistics being the academic umbrella term for all of this heady investigation of where and why a word exists, what its purpose is, where it came from and where it’s at at present. Essentially, it’s the delving into the nature and structure of words.

The complexity may not at first be evident. Yet humans often learn by example, so here is one example that most everyone is aware of: The word “bender,” as in: He went on a bender over the weekend. This concept, about a man losing himself in an alcohol-laced reconfiguration of reality, is hundreds of years old. Men have done this, gone and lost themselves—as in, forgetting who they are while sober—for so long and so frequently that it’s a given in society that some men will continue with this behavior, even if the behavior is socially “unacceptable” and labeled as sick/deviant/harmful. Drinking for days on end is as part of the male substructure as is traversing miles of terrain in the search for food, and the need to become strong in order to defend one’s home or territory or mate or child(ren). And please note that this is and occasionally will digress into, touch upon, the realms of sociology and anatomy and genetics, as well as religion/morality and The Law as it’s currentlt known and adhered to... Psychology, too, is a tandem component of linguistics, as it’s a cerebral endeavor, to decipher the origins of words.

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Una entrevista con

Rubén Bareiro Saguier

Jason Weiss


Escritor, investigador, combatiente cultural contra la dictadura, Rubén Bareiro Saguier (Villeta del Guarnipitán, Paraguay, 1930) vivió casi treinta años en su exilio parisino antes que el nuevo proceso democrático en su país lo nombrara Embajador de Paraguay en Francia.  Ha tenido una vida literaria singular, mientras que enseñaba y luego trabajaba como investigador en asuntos culturales, sobre todo en el bilingüismo como realidad integral de su país natal. Después de terminar su actividad diplomática en 2003, volvió a radicarse en Asunción.  La entrevista que sigue tuvo lugar en París, el 9 de julio de 1997, en la embajada paraguaya.  Entre sus libros destacan:  poesía, Biografía de ausente (1964), A la víbora de la mar (1977), Estancias, errancias, querencias (1982); cuentos, Ojo por diente (1972), El séptimo pétalo del viento (1984), La rosa azul (2005); la antología Poesía guaraní del Paraguay (1980); los estudios Tentación de la utopía, la república jesuítica del Paraguay (1988) y Augusto Roa Bastos (1988).


¿Cómo ha sentido la ironía de su situación ahora, al encontrarse como embajador de Paraguay en París?

Yo pienso que mi condición de embajador es de un proceso democrático, con el objeto de afirmar ese proceso, de ampliarlo.  Un objetivo por lo cual combatimos siempre, los que estuvimos contra la dictadura, fue el tener el derecho de representar al país, que puede hacerlo, y sobre todo ejercer un deber de ciudadano después de haber combatido tanto.  Es una consecuencia natural para mí, y un poco una revindicación en cierto sentido después de los largos años de exilio.  Entonces yo veo eso como un síntoma de lo que queremos para un país pluralista, y por eso estoy aquí.  No es fácil para un escritor que todo el tiempo estuvo contra un régimen dictatorial.  Felizmente eso ha cambiado y por eso he aceptado esta tarea.  Digo no es fácil porque París es una especie de gran pulpo, del punto de vista de la actividad que uno desarrolla en esta ciudad maravillosa.  Yo estoy en París desde el ‘62.  Durante los primeros diez años fui un exiliado de hecho, con vueltas esporádicas al país.  En el ‘72, en una vuelta al país, estuve preso.  Ya conocí la prisión de antes de venirme.  Y después de una campaña muy intensa de escritores de todo el mundo, desde Jean Paul Sarte, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Genet, todo el Boom latinoamericano, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, y la asistencia del gobierno francés, desde el Vaticano---era acusado de comunista, una cosa absurda, si yo hubiera sido lo asumiría, nunca fui---entonces me duré cuatro meses en prisión, luego volví aquí.  Ya con el exilio durante casi veinte años no podía regresar.  En el ‘89 yo volví, pero con misión del CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique).  Aparte de profesor, ya desde el ‘82 fui chercheur, directeur de recherche en el CNRS, un puesto privilegiado, digamos.

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Showing: Anne Sexton, Harlan Ellison Interview (part 1), BOMB IT trailer, Philip K. Dick documentary (part 1), and Jerome Murat.

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